Category: Around ice hockey

Is it true that ice hockey was derived from British field hockey? (Part 1)

Until the mid-1980s, it was generally accepted that ice hockey was derived from British field hockey and Native American lacrosse. Later, the study found a reference to a hockey game similar to that played in the early 1800s-Nova Scotia by the Mi’kmaq tribe (Micmac).

This game seems to have originated from the Irish throwing game and is likely to spread throughout Canada by Scottish and Irish immigrants and the British army.

A recent book, however, even suggests that the sport was born on the cold water ponds of England. Ultimately, ice hockey was probably the result of a combination of previous ball and bat games played in Northern Europe and before colonial North America.

Ice hockey was first recorded in the 1850s and the sport quickly gained widespread traction. In 1875, students from McGill University took part in the first recorded indoor hockey match in Victoria’s figure skating rink in Montreal, with rules borrowed from hockey.

Two years later, the hockey club at McGill University became the first organized team and agreed on the rules of the sport. These include limiting the number of players on each side to nine – then dropping to six. Initial records of the game, in which thirty players participated and fought, are probably similar to those played by rival companies in football.

Young sports caught the eye of Canadian President, Frederick Stanley. In 1892, Lord Stanley presented a trophy called the Dominion Challenge Cup, awarded annually to the best hockey team in North America.

The early cup was called the Stanley Cup and, since 1926, has been awarded to the winner of the National Hockey League (NHL) play-off. Then, in 1994, culturally meaningful ice hockey was permanently strengthened when the Canadian government declared it the nation’s national winter sport.

Culture and tradition

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, ice hockey spread both geographically and throughout classrooms. It is transferred from amateur sports clubs, consisting of high-class men, including tournaments and teams formed between the middle and lower classes, often by banks or public companies. operators, throughout Canada and the United States.

The President of Belarus: Ice hockey is of the best covid-19 treatments

Belarus, a small country located between Russia and the European Union member Poland with 9.5 million people. According to WHO statistics, Belarus has recorded 94 cases of covid-19 infection and no deaths.

President Alexander Lukashenko has dismissed concerns about Covid-19, telling his people that ice hockey, vodka and banya (a traditional sauna) are the best covid-19 treatment.

While most European countries have ordered social isolation, Belarus has yet to implement restrictions on large gatherings.

So far, Belarus has not closed the border but all its neighbors: Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Lithuania and Latvia have closed their borders. Restaurants, parks and bars remain open. Major sporting events took place as planned and attracted hundreds of spectators, despite the World Health Organization’s distant recommendations.

Not only are tournaments going on as planned, but fans are still attending matches across the country because Belarus has yet to implement restrictions on crowded gatherings.

The Belarussian Premier League is currently the only continental football tournament to continue in the explosion of Covid-19. Saturday derby between the two teams from the capital Minsk attracted 1,750 fans.

And Lukashenko himself was not limited to appearing in public, he participated in a hockey game on Saturday. “It is better to die than to live on your knees. This is a refrigerator, this is good for health, nothing is better than sports, especially if ice is a real antiviral drug. ” he said.

Both Lukashenko and supporters in the stands do not seem to make any effort to comply with World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on how far away from society, still hugging and patting each other’s back.

The work did not stop either, because Lukashenko was concerned about how the response of covid-19 is damaging the global economy. He said he found inspiration in U.S. President Donald Trump’s proposal that treating Covid-19 should not be worse than the virus itself.